By Emily Gerson

Simplify traffic signal condition checks into four easy-to-understand categories; good, fair, poor, and severe. After all, you can tell a lot about an asset just by looking at it. Eliminate complex asset replacement debates. Instead, use the guidelines listed below to determine the condition of the traffic signal, then act using the recommendations for each condition.

Additionally, this simplified and consistent method translates seamlessly into asset management software. It allows you to maximize data utility and is incredibly easy to track and monitor. In fact, we use the exact guidelines listed below to assess traffic signals in our asset management platform, AssetGOV [LINK].

Good – This asset just needs a traditional annual assessment.

  • The signal pole has:
    • No damage such as bending, rust and dents.
    • Pole base and bolts have no rust, no corrosion and no loose bolts.
    • The pole structure is not tilted and has no artistic stickers or graffiti.
  • The cabinet has:
    • No damages such as bending, rust and dents.
    • Base of cabinet does not have cracks or visible damage.
    • The beacon on the cabinet is not broken or cracked and has a working bulb.
    • Fan and cabin filter are not clogged or dirty.
Traffic signal pole base in good condition
Traffic signal pole base in fair condition showing slight rust

Fair – This asset needs to be scheduled for preventive maintenance.

  • The traffic signal has:
    • Very minor damage such as bending, rust and dents.
    • Pole base and bolts have minor rust, corrosion, but no loose bolts.
    • The pole structure is not tilted and has no minor artistic stickers or graffiti.
  • The cabinet has:
    • Minor damage such as bending, rust and dents.
    • Base of cabinet has minor cracks or damages visible.
    • The beacon on the cabinet has minor wear and deterioration, but has a working bulb.
    • Fan and cabin filter have minor wear and deterioration, but is working.
Poor – This asset should be scheduled and budgeted to be replaced. Preventive maintenance cannot reasonably extend the life much longer.
  • The signal pole has:
    • Visible damages such as bending, rust and dents.
    • Pole base and bolts have visible rust and corrosion, but no loose bolts.
    • The pole structure may be tilted and has artistic stickers or graffiti.
  • The cabinet has:
    • Visible damage such as bending, rust, and dents.
    • Base of cabinet has visible cracks or damage.
    • The beacon on the cabinet has visible wear and deterioration but has a working bulb.
    • Fan and cabin filter have visible wear, deterioration, and are dirty.
Traffic signal pole base in poor condition showing rust
Traffic signal pole base in severe condition showing rust and damage

Severe – This asset needs to be replaced soon, no negotiations.

  • The signal pole has:
    • Very visible damage such as bending, rust and dents.
    • Pole base and bolts have very visible rust, corrosion, and possible loose or bad bolts.
    • The pole structure may be tilted and have artistic stickers or graffiti.
  • The cabinet has:
    • Very visible damage such as bending, rust and dents.
    • Base of cabinet has very visible cracks or damages.
    • The beacon on the cabinet has very visible wear, deterioration, and a non-working bulb.
    • Fan and cabin filter have very visible wear, deterioration and are in dirty condition.

These guidelines can be used to create condition assessment standards for other types of traffic assets as well. In essence, this quick standardization will save you time and money. The guidelines are simple and easy.